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Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, from the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter

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(as of Feb 09,2021 01:45:12 UTC – Details)


Activists, pundits, politicians, and the press frequently proclaim today’s digitally mediated racial justice activism the new civil rights movement. As Charlton D. McIlwain shows in this book, the story of racial justice movement organizing online is much longer and varied than most people know. In fact, it spans nearly five decades and involves a varied group of engineers, entrepreneurs, hobbyists, journalists, and activists. But this is a history that is virtually unknown even in our current age of Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Black Lives Matter.

Beginning with the simultaneous rise of civil rights and computer revolutions in the 1960s, McIlwain, for the first time, chronicles the long relationship between African Americans, computing technology, and the Internet. In turn, he argues that the forgotten figures who worked to make black politics central to the Internet’s birth and evolution paved the way for today’s explosion of racial justice activism. From the 1960s to present, the book examines how computing technology has been used to neutralize the threat that black people pose to the existing racial order, but also how black people seized these new computing tools to build community, wealth, and wage a war for racial justice.Through archival sources and the voices of many of those who lived and made this history, Black Software centralizes African Americans’ role in the Internet’s creation and evolution, illuminating both the limits and possibilities for using digital technology to push for racial justice in the United States and across the globe.


From the Publisher

black software, african americans, racial justice, activism, computing, internetblack software, african americans, racial justice, activism, computing, internet

black software, african americans, racial justice, activism, computing, internetblack software, african americans, racial justice, activism, computing, internet

Derrick brown, award, computer programmer

Derrick brown, award, computer programmer

Mattie Arnold, Computer technician, Women in STM

Mattie Arnold, Computer technician, Women in STM

William murrell, metroserve computer store

William murrell, metroserve computer store

Derrick Brown (far right), receives award for excellence in expository writing in the eighth grade from the South Carolina lieutenant governor, Nancy Stevenson, 1982.

Courtesy of Derrick Brown

Mattie Arnold, Dept. 292, solders wires to a heart sink, one of the major components of a mid-pac. The manufacture of mid-pacs, a voltage and current regulation unity, began in January of 1969.

Courtesy of International Business Machines Corporation

William Murrell, president of MetroServe Computer Corporation, using phone and computer, 1990.

Courtesy of William Murrell

black software, african americans, racial justice, activism, computing, internetblack software, african americans, racial justice, activism, computing, internet

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