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great speakers for any weather


The best outdoor speaker allows users to take their music with them without compromising on sound or worrying about the weather.

An outdoor speaker is designed to survive whatever Mother Nature (or you) can throw at it. As such the speakers on this list can resist dust or water, are designed to survive any accidental knocks or drops and deliver an audio performance as good as speakers made for the home.

Outdoor speakers often come with features such as handles or are small small enough to fit into a rucksack, making them a perfect choice for outdoor parties, trips to the beach or to the local park.

Here is Trusted Reviews list of what we think are the the best outdoor speakers, ready to survive any mishap.


1. Ultimate Ears Wonderboom 2

A small wonder

Pros:

  • Huge sound
  • Easy to use
  • 13-hour battery life
  • Outdoor Boost is useful

Cons:

Almost identical to the original Wonderboom, the Wonderboom 2 brings with it a few important tweaks.

New features arrive in Outdoor Boost and Double Up; the former boosting the mid-range when outside and the latter introducing stereo pairing. And for such a small unit, the Wonderboom 2 is surprisingly loud and energetic.

Its IP67 rating ensures it can survive wet conditions, and with 13 hours of battery life, you’ve a days’ worth of fun.

2. Sonos Roam

The true portable Sonos speaker

Pros:

  • Excellent, neutral-sounding performance
  • Well built
  • New features are useful
  • Easy to use
  • Auto Trueplay

Cons:

  • Sonos S2 can be a little flaky with new features
  • Could be said it lacks visual pizzazz
  • Wireless charging plate an optional extra

The Sonos Roam is what we envisaged the Sonos Move would be. Both operate as a Sonos-like speaker in the home, but out of the two, the Roam is easily the more portable.

Give the features it offers; it’s rather sensibly priced in our minds. Few, if any other wireless speakers, combine Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity, as well as function as a smart speaker for less than the Roam’s asking price. It’s easy to use, the build quality is tough enough to survive scrapes in the outdoors and the 10-hour battery is around what we’d expect for an outdoor speaker.

It sounds terrific: natural, detailed and clear and certainly within the same sounding realm as Sonos’ more expensive speakers. It’s a bit light on bass, but that’s not unsurprising given its small size.  For existing Sonos owners it makes plenty of sense as it truly does extend the Sonos sound into the outdoors. For everyone else it’s the cheapest way into the world of Sonos.

Beosound A1 2nd Gen

3. B&O Beosound A1 2nd Gen

Hi-fi sound for the outdoors

Pros:

  • Excellent sound
  • Portable
  • Alexa support
  • Great style
  • Waterproof design

Cons:

The A1 2nd gen is the world’s first Bluetooth-only speaker to support Alexa, but more than that, it’s a portable speaker with an excellent audio performance.

Alexa works by communicating via the Bluetooth signal from your phone, providing answers to your queries without much in the way of hiccups. The speaker is full water- and dustproof, but at £200 it’s not a speaker to be careless with anyway. It’s the audio that makes the biggest impression here: detailed, clear and boasting plenty of bass from a small form factor, it’s a wonderfully expressive effort.

4. Sonos Move

An outdoor speaker that adapts to its surroundings

Pros:

  • Big, powerful sound
  • Confident bass performance
  • Can work like any other Sonos speaker
  • Voice assistant and multi-room capability

Cons:

  • Expensive
  • Not exactly portable

The Move is Sonos’ first Bluetooth speaker, and can be used in the home or outdoors. It marks the debut of Sonos’ Auto Trueplay feature, which adapts the sound to fit its environment. It’s tough enough to survive some falls and inclement weather, plus its IP56 rating guards it against dust, water, mud and such like.

It’s a big, powerful speaker with an assured bass performance – and while it isn’t exactly portable at 3kg, it’s the most versatile speaker on this list.

5. LG XBOOM PL7

A fun party speaker

Pros:

  • Clear, detailed sound
  • Long-battery life (with a few caveats)
  • Big bass
  • Design an improvement over the PK7

Cons:

  • Treble could be better
  • On the heavy side no aptX/aptX-HD

The XBOOM PL7 is big (shaped like an American football) and tips the scales at 1.4kg, but is still less bulky than its PK7 predecessor and looks less like a toy. Battery life is 24 hours at 50% volume, which should be enough time to gallivant around with it in the garden or in the park. The IPX5 water resistance is enough to shield it from some mild inclement weather, but we’d avoid using it around a pool in case it falls in.

The loss of aptX-HD from the PK7 is noted, but the sound quality still impresses. The delivery belies its XBOOM name with a controlled but weighty sound. It’s not a particularly wide soundstage but the bass is tightly delivered and dynamically it entertains. Some may find the light show that accompanies the performance gimmicky, but we like it as it gives the XBOOM some personality. It’s an unabashed party speaker with a sound that’s more mature than you’d expect.

6. KitSound Diggit 55

An outdoor speaker you can stick in the ground

Pros:

  • Clear, detailed performance
  • Can be used indoors and out
  • Easy to use
  • Good looks

Cons:

  • Bass lacks excitement
  • Not fully waterproofed

KitSound’s Diggit 55 impresses both as indoor and outdoor speaker, offering fantastic value for money and a novel ‘stake’ solution for outdoor use.

Some elaboration is probably needed with the ‘stake’. While indoors it can be used as a conventional Bluetooth speaker, outdoors there’s the option of inserting a stake to plant it into the ground. The benefit is that it allows sound to travel further instead of being absorbed by the earth, and in our testing we found it live up to the marketing hype.

The Diggit 55 can be stereo paired with another to produce a bigger sound, with left and right channels filling a decently-sized garden. It’s not fully waterproof, so we wouldn’t suggest leaving it close to a pool (in case it falls in) or outside in the rain. Battery is improved over the original at nearly double the life so the KitSound should easily last a few days. We like the Outdoor EQ mode too, offering more scale and volume.

The mid-range of the KitSound is its best characteristic, sounding natural, detailed and clear. Treble frequencies are well-handled (at this price), while bass is tepid with its flat and uniform description. If you want more energy there are others on this list that are a better guarantee of that, and while it’s not geared to more critical listening, we’d heartily recommend the Diggit 55.

7. Marshall Emberton

Stylish and rugged

Pros:

  • Rugged design
  • Entertaining sound
  • Nice control interface
  • Stylish looks

Cons:

  • Other speakers deliver more precision and clarity
  • Slightly soft bass

Marshall’s smallest speaker is one made for the outdoors, combining stylish, rugged build and enjoyable audio performance into one compact form.

Unlike some other speakers on this, the Emberton doesn’t feature a carry strap, which may slightly hamper its portable credentials. But, it’s design means it can survive whatever nature can throw at it, and battery life is 20+ hours, so this speaker has enough energy reserves to last almost a day.

The audio quality is entertaining, packing that signature Marshall energy but not going overboard with it. Vocals come across clearly, there’s detail to be found and the Stereophonic feature means wherever you’re sitting you’re getting a similar audio performance.

8. Tribit Stormbox Micro

Cheap and versatile

Pros:

  • Clear and detailed performance
  • Dust and waterproof
  • Good, smart design
  • Affordable price

Cons:

  • Not the most directional-sounding speaker

The Stormbox Micro is a small speaker but it packs a big surprise. It’s the first effort we’ve heard of the brand and we can’t wait to hear what else they have in store.

The Micro’s tear-resistant strap allows it to be placed on a handlebar of a bicycle or attached to a backpack. The 8-hour battery life is slightly less than what we’ve come to expect, while its IP67 ratings protect it from dust and water.

The sound is much better than we’d imagined, with bass bigger than expected and audio cleanly delivered and detailed. Considering its size it doesn’t pitch the broadest of sounds, nor is it the most directional sounding of speakers (sound has a tendency to be fired up rather than at the listener). Nevertheless, the Tribit is great value for its £40 asking price.

UE Wonderboom

9. Ultimate Ears Wonderboom

Nigh-on unbreakable

Pros:

  • Pretty much unbreakable
  • Solid battery life
  • Ridiculously loud

Cons:

  • Doesn’t handle mid-range well

If you’re after a Bluetooth speaker for your travels but don’t want to spend a small fortune, the original Wonderboom can still do a job.

Small and rugged, it can survive submersion into water at 1m for 30 minutes, meaning it’s great for pool parties. 10 hours of battery life before it conks out is still a respectable figure – and, as is usual from Ultimate Ears, the Wonderoom delivers a big sound with plenty of bass.

10. JBL Xtreme 3

All about that bass

Pros:

  • Great sound quality
  • Deeper bass than the Xtreme 2
  • Highly portable despite substantial size

Cons:

  • Almost no smart features
  • Sound isn’t quite as measured as the Xtreme 2’s

The JBL Xtreme 3 is a wireless speaker tailor made for outdoor use. For those not interested in multi-room or digital assistants, this would make for a good alternative to the Sonos Roam.

It is quite heavy at almost 2kg, but its size gets you around 15-hours of battery life – more than enough for a day’s frolicking outside. The IP67 rating provides waterproofing and protection from dust, so it’s very rugged and durable. The shoulder strap adds another element of portability for carrying it around. It’s not particularly stylish, but that’s not the point of the speaker.

Compared to the Xtreme 2, the 3rd gen version digs deeper into the low frequency range, serving a bit more impact and punch. It perhaps doesn’t quite offer the same mid-range performance as its predecessor, but we’d say they’re roughly equal.

Marshall Tufton

11. Marshall Tufton

A party starter

Pros:

  • Big, energetic and fun sound
  • Bluetooth 5.0
  • 20 hour+ battery life
  • Distinctive look

Cons: 

  • Expensive
  • Not the most articulate performer
  • No smart features

The Tufton is the biggest speaker in Marshall’s portable range – but, like the Sonos Move, it has a few impediments in the way of being truly portable.

For one, it’s big and although the IPX2 rating will protect it from some water splashes, this doesn’t cover being caught out in the British weather. At £349 it’s expensive, and you’ll need to feed it songs that work to its characteristics – but there’s a reason it’s on this list.

Its big, powerful and energetic sound. This speaker is infectiously fun, and with its distinctive looks the Tufton is a great way to get an outdoor party started.

12. Ultimate Ears Boom 3

Ready for adventure

Pros:

  • Great rugged features
  • Loud, clean “360-degree” sound
  • Smart-looking design

Cons:

  • No aux input
  • Some rivals offer deeper bass and a better soundstage

The Boom 3 is the Goldilocks of UE’s portable range of wireless speakers. It’s neither too big, or too small, and plays music very loud. With a clean and stylish look, the Boom 3 isn’t only waterproof, it floats too. Other speakers pip it for sound quality, but the Boom 3 is a fun speaker nevertheless.



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